My best answer right now is a quote from Pieter's MAKE book:

Solve your own problems

The most important thing is to find ideas from solving your own problems. You do that by looking at your own life and observing what your daily challenges are. Then you see if you could make those challenges easier using technology. If you solve your own problem, it's very realistic that there's many more people like you who would also love their problem solved. And that's pretty much what a business is. Solving lots of people's problems in return for money.

In startups, this business can be in the form of an application, a website or even only just a physical service tied together with some technology.

Link: https://makebook.io/#2-2

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That would be fantastic! And just today did I sign up for a new Mailchimp account. I’ll check and report back on what I can find.

This functionality is very important to me and an educational side project of mine.

Thanks @Jeff!

I didn't understand how to actually send an email with MailHog so I abandoned it. Now, I'm trying out PHPMailer https://github.com/PHPMailer/PHPMailer/. I'm required (in general) to enter my SMTP login (username, password) which makes me feel uncomfortable. Is there a secure way to store the SMTP login credentials on the live server?

Bill looks promising! I've been using Billings (for years) - https://www.marketcircle.com/billingspro/. This version (no subscription) doesn't even exist anymore but it's still running well on the latest macOS.

Super! Thanks @Ryan DiMascio with the help of this article (https://www.joshstauffer.com/send-test-emails-on-a-mac-with-mailhog/) I got it running.

I didn't understand how to actually send an email with MailHog so I abandoned it. Now, I'm trying out PHPMailer https://github.com/PHPMailer/PHPMailer/. I'm required (in general) to enter my SMTP login (username, password) which makes me feel uncomfortable. Is there a secure way to store the SMTP login credentials on the live server?

Very nice. Thanks @pugson and @pretzelhands! I was about to ask what voltage converter you use but then I realized that it's probably only a small amount of devices that can't handle dual-voltage (100-120 volt and 220-240 volt).

Maybe interesting for others is this one from Kikkerland that I just found out about: https://kikkerland.com/products/universal-travel-adapter - It's super small but versatile at the same time.

Thanks for tip. I uploaded it as an image but it doesn't seem to work for me :(