Asked

What are you reading?

What books and/or long-form articles are you reading? What do you like and dislike about them?

Maker of WIP amongst other things.
Maker of things

Atomic Habits. Still at the first few pages, so couldn’t tell more at the moment.

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HOOKED, by Nir Eyal and Ryan Hoover. Some new insights for now (I'm on page 80), but not as great as I was expecting. Let's see if this changes!

Update (25/06): I've just finished it now and, actually it did change! It's a great book.

🎨 Product Hunt's Maker of the Year 2018 and 👨‍💻Founder of Sheet2Site.com
Maker of things

Are those any good though? What's the best one other than those that you've read so far?

Latina traveling around Latam. Self-taught Software Engineer. Crypto enthusiast. Bootstrapping ClanLatam.org.

How are you finding Principles?

🌏 Serial maker

Nice, going to read the summary now static1.squarespace.com/stati…

Latina traveling around Latam. Self-taught Software Engineer. Crypto enthusiast. Bootstrapping ClanLatam.org.

Thanks for sharing! Didn't know about YouExec!

I'm doing side projects by night. Currently doing a web application to create job boards. I'm CTO at a rather big French dating application.

Badass by Kathy Sierra

I like the framework the book build to get wom 💪

2000+d streak on GitHub

Keep Going by Austin Kleon

I'm very very slow to read it because I experiment new ways of reading + taking notes, so basically I already read the first chapters maybe 4 or 5 times :)

For now, my favorite take is about having "boring" routines

Talent is overrated by Geoffrey Colvin

The premise is great. I have not completed it yet. So far, it looks good.

🌏 Serial maker

This post #marchumor

Maker of WIP amongst other things.

Well played, sir

Maker of things

Well played! 😄

Maker of WIP amongst other things.

I recently finished The Lessons of History which is a really short summary of what we can learn from history. Split up per topic.

It talks about philosophy, economics, war, religion, etc. All the big topics.

My main take-away is that history repeats itself. Things ebb and flow. An excess of X eventually leads to the opposite. For example ever-increasing capitalism will create such wealth disparity that the poor at some point vastly outnumber the rich. Leading to a more socialistic society. But when things get too socialistic, innovation stalls and the economy will stagnate. Paving the way for more capitalistic endeavours. And round the world goes.

The same is true for war and peace, religion and science, freedom and the rule of law. Etc.

Latina traveling around Latam. Self-taught Software Engineer. Crypto enthusiast. Bootstrapping ClanLatam.org.

Looks interesting! Added it to the queue :)

Full-time tech lead in the VOD industry. Building and learning on the side.

Dare to Lead is great - it's the first Brene Brown I've read - very good for improving soft skills and having integrity/values at work - and what this means to implement them.

Full-time tech lead in the VOD industry. Building and learning on the side.

Now onto Viktor Frankl - Man's search for meaning

Latina traveling around Latam. Self-taught Software Engineer. Crypto enthusiast. Bootstrapping ClanLatam.org.

Many things at once @[email protected]

I'm trying to understand better the tech+startups ecosystem in Latin America, so I'm following different rabbit holes I keep finding while researching about it (ex. the history of Gran Colombia, dealflow for specific industries in Brazil in the past years...). And I started this book recently: www.amazon.com.br/historias-E…

I'm disagreeing a lot with some of the author's conclusions (ex. he talks about Brazil and Mexico as countries that can have their innovation achievements compared easily, even makes the mistake to casually put Finland as an example we should follow when our challenges and potential growth are completely different, and vary a lot by Latam country). But the plan is to use some of the pieces he put together to help build a new narrative about the region, closer to the industry than to the academia.

I'm on a second listening of Atomic Habits. The audio book format works really well for it.

I picked up "The Happy Body" because I heard that it is good for addressing back and other issues from sitting too much. That's one issue from all of the extra COVID-19 time.

2000+d streak on GitHub

Start reading "Make" by @levelsio (•̀ᴗ•́)و ̑̑

Maker of things

I can confirm that it's an entertaining read. 😀

Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel

One of my favourites 😍

I'm rereading The Black Swan by Nassim Taleb.

Maker of things

What's good about it man?

The basic hypothesis of the book is that sudden high-impact events shape the world much more than planned or predicted events. But, as with all good books, I can't tell you in a few words why it's so good.

Traveling, meeting people, working on Coworkies | twitter.com/idmtr

Walden Two by B.F. Skinner Found it while researching on self sustained communities. It's a reference book for many post-hippie years communities that managed to survive to this day. It's a quick read with few points that stand out and one can think of.

🧙‍♂️ Making diagram.news 🌶 Frontend at the Boston Globe 🇷🇺 Code editor at Practicum 📰 Prev Washington Post, NYU

Reading The Fifth Risk. Michael Lewis wrote Liar's Poker, Money Ball, The Big Short, and other finance books. This one is about the Obama-Trump transition and focuses (at least as far as I've read) on the Department of Energy. Super interesting.